Anna Begins...

Ask me anything   I am not worried - I am not overly concerned
with the status of my emotions
"oh", She says, "you're changing."
But were always changing
It does not bother me to say this isn't love
Because if you don't want to talk about it then it isn't love
and I guess I'm going to have to live that
but, I'm sure there's something in a shade of gray
or something in between
and I can always change my name if that's what you mean
My friend assures me "it's all or nothing`
But I am not really worried
I am not overly concerned
You try to tell your self the things you try tell your self to make
yourself forget
to make your self forget
I am not worried
"If it's love" she said, "then were gonna have to think about the
consequences"
She can't stop shaking and I can t stop touching her and.....
This time when kindness falls like rain
It washes her away and Anna begins to change her mind
"these seconds when I'm shaking leave me shuddering
for days" she says.
And I'm not ready for this sort of thing

wordsnquotes:

AUTHOR OF THE DAY: Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf was born on January 25, 1882 in London, England. Born into a privilege household filled with free-thinkers, Woolf was able to develop her talent from an early age. 
Growing up in an intellectually and artistically well-connected family, Woolf was allowed to hone her writing skills when she first created a family newspaper, the Hyde Park Gate News in her childhood. Woolf was known for being extremely light-hearted and playful and recorded family anecdotes in her newspaper. 
Although Woolf was a happy child, she experienced a dark period at the age of 6, when she was sexually abused by her half-brothers. This traumatic event was deepened by the sudden death of her mother at the age of 49, which propelled her into a nervous breakdown. Two years later her half-sister passed away, which added to her depression. 
Despite her despair, Woolf intellectually fed herself by taking courses in German, Greek and Latin at the Ladies’ Department of King’s College London. Then in 1904 her father passed away, which pushed her to be institutionalized. This pattern between literary exploration and personal desperation and despair reigned in her lifetime. 
Although bouts of depression and severe mood swings plagued Woolf, her literary career soared. She was famous for playing with several literary devices, such as dream-like scenes, free form prose, complicated plot lines and unusual narrative point of views. By her mid-forties, Woolf had established herself as a household name. She habitually spoke in several colleges and wrote compelling essays and self-published short stories.
Woolf was able to find love with a man named, Leonard; they remained sweethearts for life. He was extremely aware and supportive of Woolf’s internal conflict. While working on Between the Acts, Leonard noticed her inevitable demise. During this time their home was destroyed in London during the Blitz. Leonard, a Jewish man, was in danger of being captured by the Nazis. This detrimental fact pushed Woolf into her suicide. On March 28, 1941, Woolf filled the pockets of her overcoat with stones and walked out into the River Ouse, where the stream took her. In her last note to her loving husband she wrote:

"Dearest, I feel certain that I am going mad again. I feel we can’t go through another of those terrible times. And I shan’t recover this time. I begin to hear voices, and I can’t concentrate. So I am doing what seems the best thing to do. You have given me the greatest possible happiness. You have been in every way all that anyone could be. I don’t think two people could have been happier till this terrible disease came. I can’t fight any longer. I know that I am spoiling your life, that without me you could work. And you will I know. You see I can’t even write this properly. I can’t read. What I want to say is I owe all the happiness of my life to you. You have been entirely patient with me and incredibly good. I want to say that—everybody knows it. If anybody could have saved me it would have been you. Everything has gone from me but the certainty of your goodness. I can’t go on spoiling your life any longer. I don’t think two people could have been happier than we have been. V."

After World War II, her popularity declined, but surged in the 1970s, during the feminist movement. Regardless of Virginia Woolf’s demons she is one of the most influential authors of the 21st century. 
NOTABLE WORKS
Mrs. Dalloway (1925)
To the Lighthouse (1927)
Orlando (1928)
A Room of One’s Own (1929)
The Waves (1931)
Read excerpts by Virginia Woolf here! Get her books here! 

wordsnquotes:

AUTHOR OF THE DAY: Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf was born on January 25, 1882 in London, England. Born into a privilege household filled with free-thinkers, Woolf was able to develop her talent from an early age. 

Growing up in an intellectually and artistically well-connected family, Woolf was allowed to hone her writing skills when she first created a family newspaper, the Hyde Park Gate News in her childhood. Woolf was known for being extremely light-hearted and playful and recorded family anecdotes in her newspaper. 

Although Woolf was a happy child, she experienced a dark period at the age of 6, when she was sexually abused by her half-brothers. This traumatic event was deepened by the sudden death of her mother at the age of 49, which propelled her into a nervous breakdown. Two years later her half-sister passed away, which added to her depression. 

Despite her despair, Woolf intellectually fed herself by taking courses in German, Greek and Latin at the Ladies’ Department of King’s College London. Then in 1904 her father passed away, which pushed her to be institutionalized. This pattern between literary exploration and personal desperation and despair reigned in her lifetime. 

Although bouts of depression and severe mood swings plagued Woolf, her literary career soared. She was famous for playing with several literary devices, such as dream-like scenes, free form prose, complicated plot lines and unusual narrative point of views. By her mid-forties, Woolf had established herself as a household name. She habitually spoke in several colleges and wrote compelling essays and self-published short stories.

Woolf was able to find love with a man named, Leonard; they remained sweethearts for life. He was extremely aware and supportive of Woolf’s internal conflict. While working on Between the Acts, Leonard noticed her inevitable demise. During this time their home was destroyed in London during the Blitz. Leonard, a Jewish man, was in danger of being captured by the Nazis. This detrimental fact pushed Woolf into her suicide. On March 28, 1941, Woolf filled the pockets of her overcoat with stones and walked out into the River Ouse, where the stream took her. In her last note to her loving husband she wrote:

"Dearest, I feel certain that I am going mad again. I feel we can’t go through another of those terrible times. And I shan’t recover this time. I begin to hear voices, and I can’t concentrate. So I am doing what seems the best thing to do. You have given me the greatest possible happiness. You have been in every way all that anyone could be. I don’t think two people could have been happier till this terrible disease came. I can’t fight any longer. I know that I am spoiling your life, that without me you could work. And you will I know. You see I can’t even write this properly. I can’t read. What I want to say is I owe all the happiness of my life to you. You have been entirely patient with me and incredibly good. I want to say that—everybody knows it. If anybody could have saved me it would have been you. Everything has gone from me but the certainty of your goodness. I can’t go on spoiling your life any longer. I don’t think two people could have been happier than we have been. V."

After World War II, her popularity declined, but surged in the 1970s, during the feminist movement. Regardless of Virginia Woolf’s demons she is one of the most influential authors of the 21st century. 

NOTABLE WORKS

Mrs. Dalloway (1925)

To the Lighthouse (1927)

Orlando (1928)

A Room of One’s Own (1929)

The Waves (1931)

Read excerpts by Virginia Woolf here! Get her books here

(via shipatfirstsight)

— 6 hours ago with 1175 notes

halffizzbin:

sra-foreveralone:

best response to a sexist boyfriend

If you haven’t seen She’s The Man yet you need to examine your life choices.

(Source: seventhdevil, via cbk1000)

— 8 hours ago with 1020228 notes

tamorapierce:

owning-my-truth:

rubyvroom:

Sorry for the extremely lengthy post on your dashes but this is so important

SHARE THIS!

Don’t let them get away with this.  Share the tumblr; share the information. If we can’t trust even the state government, let’s go to the federal.  JUSTICE FOR MIKE BROWN AND FERGUSON.

(via notsomolly)

— 8 hours ago with 76342 notes

notallwhowanderarelost2:

Helplessness Blues - Fleet Foxes
If I know only one thing, it’s that everything that I see
Of the world outside is so inconceivable often I barely can speak
Yeah I’m tongue-tied and dizzy and I can’t keep it to myself
What good is it to sing helplessness blues
Why should I wait for anyone else?

This song is perfection.

(Source: play-listings, via notsomolly)

— 13 hours ago with 2671 notes
did-you-kno:

Scientists have found a way to “switch off” autoimmune diseases by converting cells that attack healthy tissue into cells that protect against disease. This incredible breakthrough has the potential to save the lives of millions of people. Source

did-you-kno:

Scientists have found a way to “switch off” autoimmune diseases by converting cells that attack healthy tissue into cells that protect against disease. This incredible breakthrough has the potential to save the lives of millions of people. Source

— 13 hours ago with 3959 notes
slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

(via howelljenkinspendragon)

— 15 hours ago with 51144 notes

ill-ary:

'Meet the Generation of Incredible Native American Women Fighting to Preserve Their Culture' via Marie Claire

(via mango-pirates)

— 15 hours ago with 47715 notes

yagazieemezi:

Nadine Ijewere is a photographer out of London with an amazing talent for portraiture and fashion photography. She creates  beautiful environments for her work using from floral and cultural influences. I love it all.

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

(via adrienne-hp)

— 16 hours ago with 6155 notes

thinksquad:

Jeffrey Grossman, a Chatham High School graduate, was apprehended by the U.S. Secret Service last Thursday when he successfully climb over the White House fence. He was wearing a Pokemon-themed shirt and hat, and carried a Pikachu doll from the Pokemon card game and cartoon.

Grossman went to an out-of-state hospital to admit himself for mental health treatment but was unable to due to his healthcare coverage. When he asked about it further, he was told that was how the healthcare system is set up and he should talk with the president about it. He then traveled to Washington, D.C.

“I was informed that, when he was apprehended, he told security that he had come to talk with the president about his health care program,” his mother, a local pharmacist, said.

http://www.troyrecord.com/general-news/20140915/rensselaer-man-detained-after-trying-to-reach-president

— 1 day ago with 1441 notes

epicleicaness:

doctorofdragons:

Jon Stewart wins over O’Reilly ever single time. 

BURN

(Source: sandandglass, via tattooed-she-wolf)

— 1 day ago with 249213 notes